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In a Saturday post, on the question as I'd put it of "when, if ever, do Big Clients need Big Law", Patrick Lamb at In Search of Perfect Client Service advanced the ball the furthest so far using both sports... [Read More]

» Patrick Lamb on GAL's Big Law Inquiry from What About Clients?
In a Saturday post, on the question as I'd put it of "when, if ever, do Big Clients need Big Law", Patrick Lamb at In Search of Perfect Client Service advanced the ball the farthest so far using both sports... [Read More]

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Greatest American Lawyer

There are certainly cases where 20 or more lawyers and staff are required. Pat makes a great point about foot soldiers.

It is interesting though. I sometimes go up against the largest companies with the biggest big law. Often, I don't see their advantage in the court room at all. I can usually handle the paper and motion war. What we lack in numbers, we make up for in efficiency and strategy. Sometimes big law litigation is little more than a lot of activity and little bang for the buck.

The number and types of cases that really require big law foot soldiers (Mass Tort Defense) are growing fewer by the day. I see a day where I can put together a team of 20 of the best people from multiple firms, big and small, in order to put "the best" feet on the ground. Technology makes it possible to collaborate as though we were all in the same room.

Great post Pat. Thanks for linking to us and starting the discussion which is criss-crossing the blogosphere. Someone has to get the question on the table. Maybe more big company clients will start to ask the same questions someday soon. Does BigLaw really have the advantage? Can they really deliver the value we deserve?

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